The Fishbowl

My life long obsessions with the fiber & textile arts, Sci-Fi, music, and photography.
carpinska:

jacobyeung:

Man in a striped suit, looking over the Chicago River, Chicago


©2014 Jacob M Yeung




My blind neighbor.

 I informed Vincent that he is famous.

carpinska:

jacobyeung:

Man in a striped suit, looking over the Chicago River, Chicago

©2014 Jacob M Yeung

My blind neighbor.

I informed Vincent that he is famous.

nevver:

“If you could say it in words, there would be no reason to paint.”
Edward Hopper

A good deed dies, when it is spoken about.

—Arabic Proverb (via surbeat)

(via oinonio)

citylandscapes:

Chicago Skyline from the 96th floor of the Hancock Tower. #architecture #cityscape #chicago #landscape #beautiful

citylandscapes:

Chicago Skyline from the 96th floor of the Hancock Tower. #architecture #cityscape #chicago #landscape #beautiful

crusherccme:

found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

crusherccme:

found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

(via pricklylegs)

neurosciencestuff:

New research links bad diet to loss of smell
Could stuffing yourself full of high-fat foods cause you to lose your sense of smell?
A new study from Florida State University neuroscientists says so, and it has researchers taking a closer look at how our diets could impact a whole range of human functions that were not traditionally considered when examining the impact of obesity.
"This opens up a lot of possibilities for obesity research," said Florida State University post-doctoral researcher Nicolas Thiebaud, who led the study examining how high-fat foods impacted smell.
Thiebaud led the study in the lab of Biological Science Professor Debra Ann Fadool. Their work is published in the Journal of Neuroscience and shows that a high-fat diet is linked to major structural and functional changes in the olfactory system, which gives us our sense of smell.
It was the first time researchers had been able to demonstrate a solid link between a bad diet and a loss of smell.
The research was conducted over a six-month period where mice were given a high-fat daily diet, while also being taught to associate between a particular odor and a reward (water).
Mice that were fed the high-fat diets were slower to learn the association than the control population. And when researchers introduced a new odor to monitor their adjustment, the mice with the high-fat diets could not rapidly adapt, demonstrating reduced smell capabilities.
"Moreover, when high-fat-reared mice were placed on a diet of control chow during which they returned to normal body weight and blood chemistry, mice still had reduced olfactory capacities," Fadool said. "Mice exposed to high-fat diets only had 50 percent of the neurons that could operate to encode odor signals."
For Thiebaud and his colleagues, the results are opening up a whole new line of research. They will begin looking at whether exercise could slow down a high-fat diet’s impact on smell and whether a high-sugar diet would also yield the same negative results on smell as a high-fat diet.
Funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the study comes at an important time with obesity rates at all-time highs throughout the world. According to the NIH, more than two in three adults in the United States are considered to be overweight or obese. Additionally, about one-third of children and adolescents ages 6 to 19 are considered to be overweight or obese.

neurosciencestuff:

New research links bad diet to loss of smell

Could stuffing yourself full of high-fat foods cause you to lose your sense of smell?

A new study from Florida State University neuroscientists says so, and it has researchers taking a closer look at how our diets could impact a whole range of human functions that were not traditionally considered when examining the impact of obesity.

"This opens up a lot of possibilities for obesity research," said Florida State University post-doctoral researcher Nicolas Thiebaud, who led the study examining how high-fat foods impacted smell.

Thiebaud led the study in the lab of Biological Science Professor Debra Ann Fadool. Their work is published in the Journal of Neuroscience and shows that a high-fat diet is linked to major structural and functional changes in the olfactory system, which gives us our sense of smell.

It was the first time researchers had been able to demonstrate a solid link between a bad diet and a loss of smell.

The research was conducted over a six-month period where mice were given a high-fat daily diet, while also being taught to associate between a particular odor and a reward (water).

Mice that were fed the high-fat diets were slower to learn the association than the control population. And when researchers introduced a new odor to monitor their adjustment, the mice with the high-fat diets could not rapidly adapt, demonstrating reduced smell capabilities.

"Moreover, when high-fat-reared mice were placed on a diet of control chow during which they returned to normal body weight and blood chemistry, mice still had reduced olfactory capacities," Fadool said. "Mice exposed to high-fat diets only had 50 percent of the neurons that could operate to encode odor signals."

For Thiebaud and his colleagues, the results are opening up a whole new line of research. They will begin looking at whether exercise could slow down a high-fat diet’s impact on smell and whether a high-sugar diet would also yield the same negative results on smell as a high-fat diet.

Funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the study comes at an important time with obesity rates at all-time highs throughout the world. According to the NIH, more than two in three adults in the United States are considered to be overweight or obese. Additionally, about one-third of children and adolescents ages 6 to 19 are considered to be overweight or obese.

parameciumandprotostomes:

Some quick facts about seaweed:
Seaweeds are not plants, they are algae - photosynthetic, generally aquatic organisms (with some exceptions) that can live as single cells or in colonies. Multicellular algae (i.e., seaweeds) may look like plants, but they lack a vascular system and several other major plant characteristics.
There are three main types of algae, and they cannot be grouped neatly into one branch of the tree of life. In taxonomic terms, they are a “polyphyletic” group - each type of algae is more closely related to other organisms than they are to the other two types of algae.
The three types of algae are green algae (Chlorophyta), red algae (Rhodophyta) and brown algae (Phaeophyceae).
All seaweeds must maximize their photosynthetic area while minimizing the likelihood of being ripped off the substrate on which they’re growing. There are a variety of solutions to this problem - different species of seaweed have evolved different blade lengths and widths, different stem thicknesses, and even different holdfast morpholgies, depending on the environment in which they live. An alga living in more sheltered waters can probably afford to devote more energy to increasing blade surface area (to maximize photosynthesis), while an alga living in more exposed, turbulent waters will devote more energy to increasing its structural support.
The same species of seaweed could have different morphologies depending on the local conditions where each individual is growing. The phenomenon, known as morphological plasticity, is actually extremely common, and responsible for many past errors by taxonomists trying to determine algal evolutionary trees. For example, it was once believed that there were as many as six species of the giant kelp Macrocystis, but now we know there is only one species (Macrocystis pyrifera) with several different morphologies depending on the local conditions of where it grows.
Another issue algae face is herbivory. There are many organisms that eat seaweed. Seaweeds have evolved a variety of defense systems to deal with predation - they will grow where there are fewer herbivores, some might calcify their cell walls, their life cycles are adapted to avoid herbivory on young seaweeds, and they may release chemicals to deter predators.
Some seaweeds will not only release chemicals to deter herbivores, but they will also release chemical signals if they sustain tissue damage, and these signals will be picked up by neighbouring seaweeds as a warning. The neighbouring seaweeds can then divert energy from growth to herbivore defenses. This is akin to screaming when someone attacks you, so that people nearby know of a threat and can prepare themselves accordingly.
Pictured: A bucket of assorted algae. Photo belongs to me.

parameciumandprotostomes:

Some quick facts about seaweed:

  • Seaweeds are not plants, they are algae - photosynthetic, generally aquatic organisms (with some exceptions) that can live as single cells or in colonies. Multicellular algae (i.e., seaweeds) may look like plants, but they lack a vascular system and several other major plant characteristics.
  • There are three main types of algae, and they cannot be grouped neatly into one branch of the tree of life. In taxonomic terms, they are a “polyphyletic” group - each type of algae is more closely related to other organisms than they are to the other two types of algae.
  • The three types of algae are green algae (Chlorophyta), red algae (Rhodophyta) and brown algae (Phaeophyceae).
  • All seaweeds must maximize their photosynthetic area while minimizing the likelihood of being ripped off the substrate on which they’re growing. There are a variety of solutions to this problem - different species of seaweed have evolved different blade lengths and widths, different stem thicknesses, and even different holdfast morpholgies, depending on the environment in which they live. An alga living in more sheltered waters can probably afford to devote more energy to increasing blade surface area (to maximize photosynthesis), while an alga living in more exposed, turbulent waters will devote more energy to increasing its structural support.
  • The same species of seaweed could have different morphologies depending on the local conditions where each individual is growing. The phenomenon, known as morphological plasticity, is actually extremely common, and responsible for many past errors by taxonomists trying to determine algal evolutionary trees. For example, it was once believed that there were as many as six species of the giant kelp Macrocystis, but now we know there is only one species (Macrocystis pyrifera) with several different morphologies depending on the local conditions of where it grows.
  • Another issue algae face is herbivory. There are many organisms that eat seaweed. Seaweeds have evolved a variety of defense systems to deal with predation - they will grow where there are fewer herbivores, some might calcify their cell walls, their life cycles are adapted to avoid herbivory on young seaweeds, and they may release chemicals to deter predators.
  • Some seaweeds will not only release chemicals to deter herbivores, but they will also release chemical signals if they sustain tissue damage, and these signals will be picked up by neighbouring seaweeds as a warning. The neighbouring seaweeds can then divert energy from growth to herbivore defenses. This is akin to screaming when someone attacks you, so that people nearby know of a threat and can prepare themselves accordingly.

Pictured: A bucket of assorted algae. Photo belongs to me.

(via madgeneticist)

How the Logic of "Friendzoning" Would Work If Applied in Other Instances:

  • *Man walks into a store and finds employee*
  • Man: Alright, I've had enough. Why haven't you guys hired me?!
  • Employee: Uh...well sir, when did you put in your application?
  • Man: I never filled out an application.
  • Employee: Well sir, we can't consider you for employment if you've never filled out an application.
  • Man: No, that's bullshit, because I've been coming here for years now, and every single time I tell you all how much I love this store and how much I appreciate your customer service, unlike some of your other customers might I add!
  • Employee: Well, but that doesn't-
  • Man: AND I even told you that I didn't have a job!
  • Employee: But sir, that doesn't indicate to us that you would like a job at our store. And again, if you've never filled out an application, we can't consider you. Besides, we're not hiring.
  • Man: OH! Not hiring, HA! What a laugh. I see your store go through seasonal workers all the time. They come and go like nothing, but you won't consider me as a part-time employee even though I KNOW you've been looking for workers to fill positions? That's insane!
  • Employee: Sir, we've been looking to hire a few people for management positions. Do you have any management experience?
  • Man: Well no, but what does that matter?
  • Employee: ...Well sir, that's what we're looking for. You won't be suitable for the position without management experience.
  • Man: Oh that's such a load of crap. You know, you'll be waiting around a long time for a manager if you don't lower your standards a little. Who cares if someone knows how to manage a store? I LOVE this store and I'm willing to work here, that's all that should matter to you.
  • Employee: That...doesn't make any sense.
  • Man: NO! I'm done. This is over. From now on, no more Mr. Nice Guy.
  • Employee:
  • Man:
  • Employee:
  • Man: Fuck you, slut.
foodnetwork:

Recipe of the Day: Grilled Lasagna from #FNMag Yes, it’s possible! Since this quick-fix dinner is prepared and cooked completely in throwaway foil packets, the meal is a cinch to clean up. Be sure to wrap the foil tightly, as the steam trapped inside is what’s going to cook the noodles and melt the cheese.

foodnetwork:

Recipe of the Day: Grilled Lasagna from #FNMag

Yes, it’s possible! Since this quick-fix dinner is prepared and cooked completely in throwaway foil packets, the meal is a cinch to clean up. Be sure to wrap the foil tightly, as the steam trapped inside is what’s going to cook the noodles and melt the cheese.

historical-nonfiction:

the Citadel of Qaitbay is considered one of the most important defensive strongholds. It was built in 1477 CE by Sultan Al-Ashraf Sayf al-Din Qa’it Bay (hence the name). It protected Egypt well first under the Mamelukes and then the Ottomans. Unfortunately, as the Ottomans weakened the Citadel did too. In 1798 the French Expedition easily took the fort. Inside, they discovered ome crusader weapons, which dated back to the campaign of Louis IX around 1250! Today, the fort has been restored and is now a maritime museum.

(Source: Wikipedia)

spicyshimmy:

jim kirk is the kind of person who is held prisoner in a room with a heavy ass typewriter

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a sharp, knife-like letter opener

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a heavy metal whatever this thing is

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a big ol’ trash can which would be excellent for smashy smash

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and instead of using any of these things he’s like, my weapon of choice?

is a fucking blanket

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creativity, thy middle name is tiberius

(via pricklylegs)